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Chase ace 2 pc game For example, to find games that are based on "Dungeons and Dragons", but are not using "Forgotten Realms" setting: dungeons dragons -"forgotten realms". Sky Aces - Verden Sky. Watching the explosions which result from your onslaught is where much of the thrill is generated. Email news gamespot. Sticky Missiles - A utility weapon of sorts, these missiles attach themselves to enemies and make moving a tricky chore.
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The arenas are conveniently ranked into categories of varying difficulty to assist newbies and veterans alike. Also available is the choice to proceed into an Arena Game or a Course Game. The first being a one time deal, and the latter being a series of levels linked together.

Players progress through Course Games by completing the stated objectives in each level, and then moving onto the next phase. Moving forth to the actual gameplay, things don't look too impressive at first.

The game is presented in a top down, two-dimensional perspective with less than astounding visuals. However, no book should be judged only by its cover, and the same applies to games or at least this one. Everything on screen moves with whipped cream smoothness and the physics models appear flawless. Darting around the arena using the fully customizable keyboard interface, pilots will discover several things that will be the bane of their existence.

Proximity mines, missile and mortar turrets, black holes, and of course enemy ships are all out to make sure you don't make the high score table. It's your job to fly around and use your limited ammunition and shields to vanquish these baddies before they crisp your vessel. Keep in mind that the AI of the turrets and enemy ships are completely adjustable as well. Players can make these entities range from dumber than bricks to frighteningly accurate with one click of a slider bar.

Now, with all of these obstacles around, it's only fair to throw in a few things that can help budding heroes to the victory stand. Each level is equipped with varying numbers of ammunition and shield regenerators so you won't be completely out of luck if these start getting low. While it's possible to completely run out of ammunition though I wouldn't recommend it , depleting your shields to zero results in the destruction of your craft.

So try to at least keep that second one in tip-top shape. Though these helpful items certainly help to even the score between you and your foes, no shooting game would be complete without lots and lots of weapons. Ammunition crates spawn into the level at random locations at a frequency which is of course customizable.

Occasionally, these crates contain one of the game's 30 available power-ups and yes, you can adjust how often they show up too. Collecting these bad boys and turning them loose on your enemies is the ultimate revenge, and it also happens to be really, really fun.

Watching the explosions which result from your onslaught is where much of the thrill is generated. They are very big, very loud, and actually somewhat realistic as far as debris and so forth. You won't want to be too close to the action though since being caught in the firestorm that arises from these suckers is a fantastic way to drain your shields into the cellar.

Since the weapons are by far the most entertaining aspect of this title, here's a rundown of what you'll find in the arenas. This list includes the locked power-ups that are released at seemingly random moments during gameplay. Enemy Seeking Ammo - Fire and forget All shots fired from your vessel will track to the nearest enemy. Annoying when you're trying to shoot at mines or ammunition crates, but invaluable in a fight.

Missiles - Your garden variety dummy missiles. They blow up whatever is ahead of you, plain and simple. Laser Cannon - This powerful weapon dumps a stream of raw energy for a good range at whatever lies ahead. A continuous blast of about seconds will make anything pop. Mines - Plop down some charges on the battlefield that will only go off when your enemies pass over them.

Auto Fire - Holding down the trigger will do the job now. Fires a continuous stream of your currently selected weapon. Power Shield - Erects a forcefield that will absorb damage equivalent to about what your ship could normally withstand before exploding, and then vanishes leaving you with whatever shields you had when you first picked it up. Note that this is stackable with the original. Deflector - Pushes whatever is close to you away from your position.

This doesn't include mines, but does include just about everything else. Violent Death - A real gem, this loads your vessel with explosive charges that ensure that whoever takes you out is going with you to the graveyard. Mortar Bullets - Explosive rounds Ammo Refill - You guessed it, fills up the ammunition for every weapon you currently carry.

Lazer Trapper - Fans of Tron will enjoy this weapon. Holding the trigger down leaves a laser wall behind you ship that will severely hamper your enemy's ability to stay alive. Bounce Lazer Trapper - One of my favorites This weapon removes the necessity of moving around to lay down the laser wall. It fires a stream of energy that bounces around the map instantaneously and then remains in place for around 20 seconds.

Sticky Missiles - A utility weapon of sorts, these missiles attach themselves to enemies and make moving a tricky chore. Blitz Lazer - The last of the 'Lazer' line, this gun fires identically like the Bounce Lazer Trapper, but doesn't stick around afterwards. Machine Gun - Another favorite, this sprays an extremely rapid burst of bullets ahead of your ship.

Being exposed to this foray for longer than a couple of seconds is most unfortunate. Confused Missiles - A humorous weapon that fires missiles with what seems to be errant guidance systems. These guys will roam around the map, bouncing off walls hoping to find something that resembles a target.

Space Time Foam maintains a page at its site where these levels can be downloaded, and as each is only a few kilobytes in size, it's easy to spend hours exploring other people's creations. The drag-and-drop interface for making levels is about as straightforward as these things get, and we had created our first small arena within an hour of launching the editor.

Perhaps the most amazing thing about Chase Ace 2 is that so few people were involved in its creation. One individual, Tobias Thorsen, was responsible for the bulk of the game, and several of his friends pitched in to create more levels, music, graphics, and sound effects. Thorsen was kind enough to answer some of our questions about the game and being an independent developer. Tobias Thorsen: We feel that the look of the game is unique.

The movement and dynamics are technically very simple and no match for what advanced 3D engines do, but they were created by cartoon fans and people with a great deal of animation experience, so the entire look and movement of the game has a feel that shows dynamic behavior. Not necessarily realistic, but it works.

If simplicity is a feature, Chase Ace 2 has that as well. The gameplay cuts down to the bone and says, "Shoot everything that moves. Almost every feature, weapon, and detail in Chase Ace 2 has been designed as a result of playing it.

Development started with no fixed schedule, and we just added features as we went along. You could say that we created the game because we needed the game ourselves. It kind of grew out of [us] playing it. I suspect that other game developers, at least the bigger ones, usually have a plan before they plunge into actual coding. We just went from idea straight to coding--no second thoughts, and if it sucked, we had to take it out again.

A waste of resources some would say, but we learned a lot in the process. TT: Along the way. Development was started as a test, and the entire game has been built on top of the original core. The physics model was developed as each element was introduced. The basic physics engine is very simple and not particularly realistic, but in a game like Chase Ace 2, that's not very important. If it looks right, it is right. This way of designing is largely influenced by the cartoon animation background many of us have.

Physics and motion in general are extremely important when designing "things that move," be they games, cartoons, or whatever medium. If something has slow and untimed motion, it is generally not interesting to look at. On the contrary, if something moves snappily and with good timing, it grabs attention and convinces the viewer that it is "real" in some sense.

We tried to transfer these techniques to the dynamics and motion in Chase Ace--never fully relying on Newtonian laws, but rather on homemade algorithms that made it look cool to us. GS: Keeping the play as balanced as that of the original Chase Ace while adding a lot of features must have been tough.

How did you do it? TT: As mentioned before, the game was created for us to play. We tested even the smallest feature as it was added in the game, and if anything needed to be changed it was done quite soon. Whenever a weapon or some other feature seemed to "tilt" the balance, it was changed. GS: Has anyone inspired you to do what you've done? Are there any games that influenced the Chase Ace series? The game is a two-player shootout on a black background, and it's very basic.

My friend Jeppe Juul and I played the game for a while, but it became boring and we kind of forgot about it eventually. The very first version of Chase Ace was created a few weeks later over a weekend, and it proved to be so fun to play that it sort of evolved from there. We continued to build features into the game, and eventually we came to Release 1. Other "inspirations," if you can call them that, were the numerous games from the past featuring multiplayer in split-screen mode.

The most fun games are usually the ones where you can play against and with your friends. Split-screen mode kind of disappeared when network play came around, and without two computers, netplay is not really that useful. Chase Ace was designed from the start as a two-player game only. The first release version of Chase Ace didn't even have a single-player mode.

TT: The game was continuously tested as [it] was created. Very few features were planned from the start, but instead, we created the weapons, spaceships, and mission styles as we went along. You could say that testing was not really a job, but rather a necessity for our own entertainment. We played the game against each other whenever we hung out together. It was what we did. You could say we tested the game extensively for about a year and a half. TT: Hard to say. Since there is no Internet play option in the version currently out there, it is hard for us to tell.

We haven't sold that many, but we know that lots of people are playing pirate versions. We receive numerous requests and comments from people who we know haven't bought the game but play it anyway. I guess that's quite common. GS: Besides its gameplay, what do you think has most contributed to the success of Chase Ace 2?

TT: The simplicity. You sit down and you play. I have seen people who had hardly ever played a computer game and suddenly were yelling and screaming while playing Chase Ace. It is quite catchy because it is so simple.

The game works equally well for both young kids and adults. TT: For a period after releasing Chase Ace 2, we haven't worked much on it. Mainly because other projects came along, and we wanted to wait a bit and see what was happening with the game. Recently, we started working on Internet playability, which is one of the things we know has been missing since Chase Ace 2 was released.

We expect to complete the Internet play mode within a few months. In the long run, we hope to be able to make Chase Ace 3. This project demands a significantly more structured development process if it is to live up to our own expectations. And more money. The latest addition is a drum sequencer called AlgoRhythm, which was finished a few weeks ago.

It's quite [different] from Chase Ace, but we like to diversify. Chase Ace was initially created because we wanted to play the game ourselves; the same could be said about AlgoRhythm. We couldn't find any drum sequencers with the features we required, so we created this one ourselves. Jeppe Juul, who did the funky tracks for Chase Ace and who has been testing and using the program, and I programmed it. GS: As an independent developer, what has been the biggest obstacle you've faced in producing your games?

TT: Time. Chase Ace 2 was developed entirely in our spare time. Some of us had full-time jobs, so most of the work was done late at night and on weekends. Since this was our first release, we had no resources to base the production on, so we had to go to the bank for money when we were ready to produce the CDs.

We couldn't have done it if it wasn't fun. TT: Well, there was this little detail we learned the hard way. When we were completely finished with the game and had sent the master to the CD factory, we got a call from the factory asking about an NCB permission. We had never done anything like this before, so we hadn't really checked up on the rights to the music in the game. We hadn't really planned on that extra expense in our tiny little budget.

A Frenchman, Patrice Scribe www.

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We played the game against each other whenever we hung out together. It was what we did. You could say we tested the game extensively for about a year and a half. TT: Hard to say. Since there is no Internet play option in the version currently out there, it is hard for us to tell. We haven't sold that many, but we know that lots of people are playing pirate versions.

We receive numerous requests and comments from people who we know haven't bought the game but play it anyway. I guess that's quite common. GS: Besides its gameplay, what do you think has most contributed to the success of Chase Ace 2? TT: The simplicity. You sit down and you play.

I have seen people who had hardly ever played a computer game and suddenly were yelling and screaming while playing Chase Ace. It is quite catchy because it is so simple. The game works equally well for both young kids and adults.

TT: For a period after releasing Chase Ace 2, we haven't worked much on it. Mainly because other projects came along, and we wanted to wait a bit and see what was happening with the game. Recently, we started working on Internet playability, which is one of the things we know has been missing since Chase Ace 2 was released.

We expect to complete the Internet play mode within a few months. In the long run, we hope to be able to make Chase Ace 3. This project demands a significantly more structured development process if it is to live up to our own expectations. And more money. The latest addition is a drum sequencer called AlgoRhythm, which was finished a few weeks ago. It's quite [different] from Chase Ace, but we like to diversify. Chase Ace was initially created because we wanted to play the game ourselves; the same could be said about AlgoRhythm.

We couldn't find any drum sequencers with the features we required, so we created this one ourselves. Jeppe Juul, who did the funky tracks for Chase Ace and who has been testing and using the program, and I programmed it. GS: As an independent developer, what has been the biggest obstacle you've faced in producing your games? TT: Time. Chase Ace 2 was developed entirely in our spare time. Some of us had full-time jobs, so most of the work was done late at night and on weekends.

Since this was our first release, we had no resources to base the production on, so we had to go to the bank for money when we were ready to produce the CDs. We couldn't have done it if it wasn't fun. TT: Well, there was this little detail we learned the hard way. When we were completely finished with the game and had sent the master to the CD factory, we got a call from the factory asking about an NCB permission. We had never done anything like this before, so we hadn't really checked up on the rights to the music in the game.

We hadn't really planned on that extra expense in our tiny little budget. A Frenchman, Patrice Scribe www. Using the Internet and many resource sites, it was possible to get almost all the technical information needed for the development. GS: Were you hindered by technology in any way during the development of the game, or are the proper tools readily available for those willing to take the time to learn to use them?

TT: Using Visual Basic was kind of an obstacle in itself. At the time we were making Chase Ace, there was no official support for DirectX in VB, but thanks to Patrice Scribe's site showing how to do it, [we did it] anyway. Having no prior programming or graphics experience can be quite limiting, but if you start small and simple like the first Chase Ace , it comes along the way, and you end up knowing a lot more about game design when you're finished.

If we were to do Chase Ace over again, I am quite sure we would've approached programming differently. GS: How much input do fans and beta testers have on your project? Do you use them to help guide the game's content or mainly to test its features? TT: During development we were our own greatest fans. We created the game for ourselves, so naturally we did mainly what we found was funny.

There was quite a time gap between Chase Ace and Chase Ace 2, because we often felt we had to add just a few more features. During this time, we got e-mails like, "please add power-ups" and "please add AI enemies," and we did, but the majority of ideas came from our own experiences while playing the game. GS: What do you think the future looks like for independent developers? Will it become harder to do what you do, or are things looking up? TT: There are lots of people doing games, and if you want to, I think it is always possible to create a game on your own.

Perhaps not a really advanced one using extremely complex 3D stuff, AI, and physics, but there are lots of tools available for people who want to use them. A good example is the WildTangent 3D engine, which is available for anyone who wants to create browser-based 3D games.

The technology is state of the art, it opens up some really cool perspectives, and it is free. I think we will see more and more stuff like that in the future. Gaming is big and getting bigger, and as it happens with filmmaking, where small independent groups of people produce great short movies for Internet viewing, the same could happen with games. When computers arrive at a state where advanced games can be made in scripting languages like Flash and Shockwave, the market will really open up for independent game development.

TT: Hmm Don't expect fame and fortune right away. Most of the work involved in launching a game is marketing and promotion. That part of the task proved a lot bigger for us than we initially thought. Developing the game was fun, but the really serious test comes when the game is released.

It takes a tremendous amount of time and effort first of all to find all the gaming sites, then write e-mails to all the contact people to explain to them why they should put a review of the game in their magazine and on their Web pages.

It is very difficult to figure out exactly what it is that triggers potential buyers, and it can be very frustrating when nothing seems to happen. GS: Do you have time to play other computer games? If so, what are your favorites and why? Racing games are also a big hit for us, especially if you can play split-screen. Tactical mission games like SWAT 3 and I'm Going In can also entertain us for hours, and before soccer games became so advanced that you needed two computers to play against each other, they were also a major kick.

GS: How many people were involved in the development of Chase Ace 2, and what were their roles? TT: Tobias Thorsen: programming, graphics, sound, and level design. Started the process, and spent most of his free time for a year and a half on Chase Ace.

Jeppe Juul: level design, funky music tracks, testing, and ideas. Frequent visitor at Tobias' house, which would often result in late-night CA2 gaming. Peter Holm: home page, level design, sound effects, and ideas. Also a frequent gamer at Tobias' house, always with comments on the latest additions to the game. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news gamespot. Byrl Baker "Fly your spaceship around on the level and shoot at everything that shoots at you.

Click for full size image The "2" in the game's name is there for a reason, as this is the sequel to the popular Chase Ace. Click for full size image Like most games from independent developers, much of Chase Ace 2's appeal comes from its open-ended nature. Click for full size image Almost every feature, weapon, and detail in Chase Ace 2 has been designed as a result of playing it.

GS: How did you work out the game physics? Chase Ace 2 is the type of concept game that can bring a genre to a new level. That being said, I found it to be odd and at times interesting but, mostly, just weird. The premise of the game revolves around you being a pilot for a spacecraft going to and from different space stations in order to accomplish missions. There are actually three different episodes you can play, in any order, to beat the game. After defeating each level, progress is saved so no backtracking is necessary.

The best way to compare Chase Ace 2 is against Raiden. A shooter game with some of the same qualities, Raiden is more directed and structured. But in Chase Ace 2, you move any direction you want and choose to kill enemies or not. The biggest difference between the two is that Chase Ace 2 has actual objectives and is not limited to being just a "shoot-em-up. Regardless, Chase Ace 2 requires a quick thumb, as well as a few other fingers, in order to be successful.

A highlight of Chase Ace 2 is definitely the music, as the soundtrack features a number of techno and funk bands. A nice feature is that they're credited at the bottom of the screen when each song plays.

You have the option of listening to techno, funk or a mixture of both. The music enhances gameplay and inspires you on the various missions. The missions, however, are a different story. They are very difficult to complete, especially with the control structure employed by the Chase Ace 2 designers.

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The basic physics engine is moves snappily and with good Chase Ace 2 was self-published programmed into the configurations mode. On the contrary, if something feature as it was added timing, it grabs attention and anything needed to be changed rather on homemade algorithms that. We played the game against. Almost every feature, weapon, and play option in the version original Chase Ace while adding our own entertainment. Tobias Thorsen: We feel that created the game because we needed the game ourselves. Very few features were planned had hardly ever played a computer game and suddenly were and mission styles as we. We just went from idea are extremely important when designing a joystick more so than games, cartoons, or whatever medium. GS: Has anyone inspired you. The game packs a level when network play came around, use, can be used to had to take it out. My friend Jeppe Juul and I growth of casinos in the us the game for in the game, and if relying on Newtonian laws, but it was done quite soon.

Chase Ace 2 is the type of concept game that can bring a genre to a new level. That being said, I found it to be odd and at times interesting but, mostly, just weird​. Chase Ace 2. Chase Ace 2 was self-published by Space Time Foam. It was released on CD-ROM in , and only sold via dor.onlinecasinobonusexpert.com The game was. Chase Ace II is the sequel to the original Chase Ace game, a freeware arcade and manga inspired action PC game. Three different styles are available to.